Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Nostalgia

The snow is gone on the Larch Hills side of the cabin.
The snow remains on the shadowed side of the cabin.
The time for nostalgia must have been previous to the tearing down of the cabin.

For now there is just no place to look, than forward. Richard and Doral are already planning their holidays.

Since Richard have 5 weeks he is going to take the first week of every month starting in May and spend one of them at the lake until October.

That idea wouldn’t have come into my head. Doral must be planning a different holiday for his 5 weeks.

The first part of the deck is gone now.
Plans for the future must be the way to take their minds off of the hard work they have been doing.

When others come to help, the way forward is clear – try to keep up with the pace of those who some to help.

Doral calls himself 50 going on 80 when it comes to physical performance.

All Richard can do in the evenings is walk back from the cabin, eat and then lay down by one of his children. Or two or three, but he does need to hit the bed.

The roof has been de-shingled.
As well, willows have been cut down and dragged to the fire.
Plans for the future must be the way to take their minds off of the hard work they have been doing.

When others come to help, the way forward is clear – try to keep up with the pace of those who some to help.

Doral calls himself 50 going on 80 when it comes to physical performance.

All Richard can do in the evenings is walk back from the cabin, eat and then lay down by one of his children.

Or two or three, but he does need to hit the bed.

Janet stops by to see how things are going.
My memories are such pleasant ones: the roof shingled with shakes, a lake-side porch that could hold 30 people as they ate supper together, a swing at the next cabin where children, getting swing pumps from adults, often heard that classic old poem, How would you like to go up in a swing / up in a swing so high.
Every board is carried to the truck.
I usually saw the view of the lake through the doorway to that cabin.

Many meals were served on the counters that ran around the perimeter of the deck.

That might be why my strongest memory is of being on the other side of the porch, the one where I was looking into the kitchen door.

My guess is that I was on the lake side of the porch picking up spoons that had fallen down there. I looked up and saw Matthew Wood trying to eat spaghetti.

He was little.

He had a fork and had the noodles caught on his utensil, but by the time he got them to his mouth, they had slipped off.

He did this over and over, never having success with his meal. I am sure I watched until I started laughing and then crying through the laughter, that little boy trying to hard and the spaghetti never cooperating with him.

Cabin 4 and 5 have been neglected for a few years.

Alice taking a long swing on a yellow seat.
With new owners, they are being refurbished, re-shingled, and refreshed. I am watching with admiration.

Arta

2 comments:

  1. The noisy cabin lake side carries memories of doing for others or having my hair done for me for church. Pony tail, bun, french braids, corn rows, pigtails, pink foam curlers ...

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  2. That porch really worked, didn't it? I have memories of small children swinging their legs over the benches, their plates in front of them ready to eat breakfast, or lunch, or maybe supper. We knew not to eat inside if the weather was working for us. So many cousins sitting in a line, chatting with one another, bemoaning the loss of their utensils over the planks of wood in front of them. The first year we were in that cabin, we cleaned out all of the undergrowth in front of the porch and carefully planted strawberries. The next year the land was full of other growth --ferns and thimble berry bushes. There was not one sign of the carefully cultivated plants from the years before.

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