Thursday, November 8, 2012

Keep Breathing



November 6, 2012

At the beginning of the cruise, in a show introducing people to the ship, some of the oldest cruisers were asked what was their secret to a long life.  A man, sitting high in the first balcony shared his formula.  Enjoy what you are doing and keep breathing.  The game show host laughed as loudly as the audience did.  I have been thinking about that all cruise as I have watched the people here doing what they do best – exercising, eating and living life to the fullest, one breath at a time.

Somewhat related to this idea, on board the ship there is a one-time game show each leg of the cruise called Love and Marriage. A newly wed couple, someone married 5 to 30 years and a third couple, usually the oldest couple in the room who can still walk, are all invited to the stage.  This show is formatted around a TV game show which other people seem to know, but one I have never seen.  Anyway, I like to go to this game show when I am onboard.  Last night was a cut above the rest of the shows.  The newly weds had been married one year.  He was in his late 60’s and in a wheel chair.  She was a bit younger.  The second couple, in their 70’s or 80’s, married seven years, were in the same condition as the first couple.  Sometimes he rode in the wheel chair and sometimes she could have. 

And now we get to the third couple – married 37 years.  The long-time-married fit-as-a-fiddle couple looked spry compared with the two newly wed couples, both of whom had to be escorted on and off the stage, someone holding them by each elbow, in case one of them slipped on the one step it took to get down off of and up to the platform. 

Talk about lively, the game show host asked the man of the couple married 7 years to kiss his wife when they got one of the answers right.  The man leaned toward his wife and turned his head somewhat in the direction of 45 degrees to kiss her, but she couldn’t turn her neck toward him far enough that the smooch could take place.  “I think we had better practise this right now, for you are going to be asked to do this a number of times, and it can’t take this long,” said the game show host. 

That was not the phrase that brought down the house.  It was when the man was asked what was the most unusual place he and his wife had made whoopee.  When the man answered, the host asked him if it was day or night.  The man said he couldn’t remember, but he did see stars. 

“Don’t we all,” said the game host. 

Thus endeth my report on Solstice Love and Marriage Game.

Arta

2 comments:

  1. I went out on the web to see some old clips from the Newly Weds game show. Perhaps that is the show to which you refer.

    It first aired the year I was born. I am pretty sure I saw some episodes pre and post being baptised. I don't recall "repenting" (aka "telling a bishop about it" in a personal priesthood interview). I did get to relive those childhood feelings of guilt mingled with intense curiosity. The contestants were married after all ... so I wasn't hearing from those who were not chaste. They were discussing things only to be shared within the confines of marriage with the host (and those watching T V nation-wide, but by virtue of being unseen to them we seemed less participatory than the host and the other contestants.)

    In retrospect it may have been one of my best opportunities to practice inferential and metaphorical thinking skills. It was not done, however, without an ounce of feeling sinful.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I went out on the web to see some old clips from the Newly Weds game show. Perhaps that is the show to which you refer.

    It first aired the year I was born. I am pretty sure I saw some episodes pre and post being baptised. I don't recall "repenting" (aka "telling a bishop about it" in a personal priesthood interview). I did get to relive those childhood feelings of guilt mingled with intense curiosity. The contestants were married after all ... so I wasn't hearing from those who were not chaste. They were discussing things only to be shared within the confines of marriage with the host (and those watching T V nation-wide, but by virtue of being unseen to them we seemed less participatory than the host and the other contestants.)

    In retrospect it may have been one of my best opportunities to practice inferential and metaphorical thinking skills. It was not done, however, without an ounce of feeling sinful.

    ReplyDelete